What is Proteomics?

Proteomics has evolved from genomics and the successful sequencing and mapping of the genomes of a wide variety of organisms, including humans.

Genomics involves using reagents, tools and technologies for the high throughput sequencing of DNA and the subsequent storage and annotation of the data. This process is complex and focuses on the information of one target molecule, DNA, in the nucleus of cells. Consequently, there is one genome for each organism.

In contrast, proteomics focuses on the identification, localization, and functional analysis of the protein make-up of the cell. The proteins present in a cell, together with their function, sub-cellular location, and perhaps even structure, change dramatically with the organism, and the conditions faced by their host cells including: age, checkpoint in the cell cycle, and external or internal signaling events.

Thus, there are many proteomes for each organism and consequently, the quantity and complexity of the data derived from the sequencing and mapping of the human proteome are estimated to be at least three times greater than that involved in the human genome project. Acquiring, analyzing, and interpreting these vast data sets requires a series of well-integrated, high-throughput technologies to lead the researcher from experimental design to biological insight.

The field of proteomics is particularly important because most diseases are manifested at the level of protein activity. Consequently, proteomics seeks to correlate directly the involvement of specific proteins, protein complexes and their modification status in a given disease state. Such knowledge will provide a fast track to commercialization and will speed up the identification of new drug targets that can be used to diagnose and treat diseases.

Perspectives in Proteomics interviews conducted at HUPO2017 in Dublin, Ireland

In 2017, eleven experts were interviewed in a series of videos titled Perspectives in Proteomics. The interview series was directed by Sanjeeva Srivastava and organized by volunteers of the Young Proteomics Investigators Club (YPIC), mentored by Mark Baker, Christopher Borchers and Stephen Pennington. 

Prof. Albert J. R. Heck

Utrecht University, Netherlands


Prof. Emma Lundberg

KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden


Dr. Henry Rodriguez

Director, Office of Cancer Clinical Proteomics Research National 

Cancer Institute National Institutes of Health, USA


Dr. Jennifer Van Eyk

Cedars-Sinai, USA


Dr. Mark Baker

Macquarie University, Australia 



More Videos

Proteomics – Translating the Code of Life
This documentary portrays the journey of “Proteomics”, discusses its advancements, achievements and key issues that lay ahead. 

Created by Dr. Sanjeeva Srivastava and the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay team. 

(http://www.bio.iitb.ac.in/~sanjeeva/documentary/)

Proteins at work – the fascinating world of proteomics
This video provides a glimpse at the fascinating world of proteomics research, the study of all proteins that form the basis for life. 

Produced for the lab of Prof. Dr. Albert Heck at Utrecht University and the Netherlands Proteomics Centre.

India Beckons
India Beckons is a short film, which portrays the journey of a scientist trained at Harvard, seeking to contribute to world class proteomics research in his motherland India. 
India Beckons
India Beckons is a short film, which portrays the journey of a scientist trained at Harvard, seeking to contribute to world class proteomics research in his motherland India. 

Proteomics Educational Videos 

Shared by Dr. Sanjeeva Srivastava and the Indian Institute of Technology Bombay

Introduction to Proteomics

Interactomics: Protein Arrays & Label free Biosensors




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